spirituality

Quotable Sources: John Muir

"Love of pure unblemished Nature seems to overmaster and blur out of sight all other objects and considerations. I know that I could under ordinary circumstances accumulate wealth and obtain a fair position in society, and I am arrived at an age that requires that I should choose some definite course for life. But I am sure that the mind of no truant schoolboy is more free and disengaged from all the grave plans and purposes and pursuits of ordinary orthodox life than mine."

— John Muir

From the Mouths of Blasphemous Babes...

What happens when a culture and its myths begin to crumble? New ones seem to arrive before the old have even disappeared. New ones in the shell of the old, from the crumbs of the old... they merge and blend and fade into one another. This can already be seen occurring in places where the system is faltering, like among the children who are splitting their time between the homeless shelters and the streets of the United States. What can be learned from such phenomena? Is this innate creative potential a threat or a source of hope for our future?
...

"Captured on South Beach, Satan later escaped. His demons and the horrible Bloody Mary are now killing people. God has fled. Avenging angels hide out in the Everglades. And other tales from children in Dade's homeless shelters." (continued...)

Stonehenges All Around Us -- by Craig Childs


Architectural relics and modern structures show that we may not be much different than our ancestors.

ARCHEOLOGISTS recently discovered what appears to be the other half of Stonehenge, illuminating what they believe is a much larger Neolithic complex than has long been envisioned. What is coming to the surface seems strangely familiar. Looking closely at Stonehenge and other Neolithic sites, we find the formative patterns of our modern world. (continued...)

Quotable Sources: The Little Prince

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The Little Prince and the Fox

It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.

— Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Grace -- by Bia Lowe

Maybe I'm reading too much into this... in identifying many microorganisms by genus alone the author leaves some ambiguity as to whether or not this piece is actually 'pro-illness' (and from the context she seems to favor a harmonically balanced duality between commensal and predatory or pathogenic forms of life), but in any case I think this is a great poem/prayer and it seems to resonate in many ways with the cultural attitudes of this paradigm-shift toward the 'retrolithic age'. It dutifully highlights our inevitable intersubjective relationship with nature -- even those of us who rarely leave an urban apartment -- and it seeks to approach this relationship in an egalitarian manner (rather than the dominating & one-sided manner that is more typical of our global civilization) in a hope that we may find more beauty & serenity... more grace. I hope you all enjoy this aptly titled poem and, if you're the religious sort, perhaps it would even make a suitable prayer.  (continued...)

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